Captain Ulrich Moeckli

Captain Ulrich Moeckli is well known in military and business circles. In the former connection his rank is that of captain of Company C of the Second Infantry Regiment of the Wisconsin National Guard and he has every reason to be proud of the excellent record made by his command. In business he is well known through his association with the Gutsch Brewing Company of Sheboygan, in which city he makes his home. He is a native of Switzerland, his birth having occurred in Marthalen Canton Zurich, on the 24th of May, 1866. His parents were Ulrich and Barbara (Wipf) Moeckli, both of whom are now deceased.

They came to America in 1884 and settled at Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin. The father had become prominent as an architect in his native country, employing from thirty to forty people. He continued in the same business in this land and also followed cabinet making and contracting. Energy and industry enabled him to overcome obstacles and difficulties in his path and he worked his way steadily upward, having gained a creditable and enviable position in business circles ere he passed away in 1886, when forty-seven years of age. His wife died January 22, 1911, at the age of sixty-four.

Captain Ulrich Moeckli, their only child, was a young man of eighteen years at the time his parents crossed the Atlantic. When his school days were over he took up the study of photography and was connected with that art in Sheboygan for twenty years. He enjoyed during that period a liberal patronage and his position was one of prominence in business circles. At length, however, he sold out and became connected with the Gutsch Brewing Company. His efforts contribute to the success of that enterprise and his name now, as always, stands near the top of the list as one of the leading business men of his city.

Mr. Moeckli is a man of fine military bearing, indicative of his training as a member of the Wisconsin National Guard. He became connected with Company C of the Second Wisconsin Regiment in 1888 and in 1891 was promoted to the rank of second lieutenant. Two years later, in 1893, he was made battalion adjutant and in 1898, with others of his command, he enlisted for active service in the Spanish-American war. His regiment was mustered into service May 12, 1898, at Camp Harvey, Milwaukee, whence it was transferred to Chickamauga Park. In July it embarked from Charleston, South Carolina, for Porto Rico and later went into action against the Spanish forces at Coamo. Captain Moeckli served all through the period of hostilities with Spain and retained his connection with the National Guard following his return home. In 1900 he was appointed captain of his company, which he now commands, having held this rank for six years. He may well be proud of his organization, in which excellent discipline is maintained, while the training of the company in the tactics of war is most admirable.

Mr. Moeckli was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Groh, a daughter of Captain Ole Groh. Her father was one of the early lake captains and a member of one of the oldest families of Sheboygan county, continuing his residence here to the time of his death, which occurred in 1912. Mr. Moeckli is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles and also of the United Spanish War Veterans. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is one of its prominent representatives in Sheboygan. He has held the office of alderman here for four years and for three years was president of the city council, during which time he wisely directed the interests of the city, exercising his official prerogatives in support of many progressive public measures and opposing useless or extravagant expenditure of the public funds. His interest in matters relative to the progress of his city is deep and sincere and he has made for himself a creditable position in business, civic and military circles.


Source

Information gathered and adapted from History of Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, Past and Present
Carl Zillier, Editor
Pubished by The S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1912, Chicago, IL