Asa Carpenter

Asa Carpenter

Asa Carpenter, one of the pioneers of Sheboygan county, migrated here from New York in 1851 and settled on eighty acres of heavily timbered land which he cleared and upon which he lived until the time of his retirement, when he removed to Plymouth. An active man politically, he served his county in positions of trust and honor for twenty years and was one of the founders of the republican party in this section.

He was born at Sandy Creek, Oswego county, New York, December 26, 1829, a son of Asa Carpenter, Sr., who was born in Connecticut, August 4, 1795, of an old eastern family. The father removed to New York when seventeen years of age on account of the death of his father, and went to live with a brother in the Empire state. He followed farming as a vocation throughout his life, dying on April 26, 1878. He with one of his brothers served in the War of 1812, being stationed on the frontier of Canada. His wife, Louisa (Wood) Carpenter, died when the subject of this review was six years of age. Eight children were born in their family and with the exception of one daughter all grew to manhood and womanhood. The father was married twice, his second union being with Suky Robbins, whose father served in the Revolutionary war and belonged to an early eastern family. She lived to be ninety-three years of age and passed away in the state of New York. Unto the second union of Mr. Carpenter one child was born, who died in 1911.

Asa Carpenter was reared in the state of New York where he received a good, common school education in Oswego county, and in 1851 came to Wisconsin, arriving in Sheboygan county on April 18. He came to this state with the intention of teaching school but owing to a misunderstanding among the schools he gave up the idea and with his ax went into the timber, where he was employed for a considerable time. Later he purchased eighty acres covered with heavy timber which he immediately began to clear, placing the land as fast as possible under cultivation. He added necessary improvements, subdued the land and brought it under a good state of tilth. He lived upon this farm for many years, until the time of his retirement, when he sold it and removed to his present home in Plymouth.

Mr. Carpenter was married April 6, 1854, to Miss Harriet Wilson, a daughter of Ezra Wilson, one of the early settlers of Sheboygan county, the family having settled here two years prior to the coming of Mr. Carpenter. She passed away February 12, 1891, and in 1892 Mr. Carpenter was again married, his second union being with Miss Edith Chase, a daughter of William Chase, also an early settler of Wisconsin, who after the war removed to Minnesota. One child, William Chase, named for his grandfather, has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter, his birth occurring March 17, 1894. He is now attending Ripon College, taking the engineering course.

Asa Carpenter has from his early manhood been a stanch republican and was one of the founders of that party in this section. He has always taken an active interest in politics and is enthusiastic regarding the grand old party and its achievements. He was for a long time connected with local politics, serving on the county board, and as chairman of the town board for many years. Mr. Carpenter, during his earlier and more active years, was one of the leading spirits of progress in political, civic and business affairs in his community. He has been a member of the Congregational church for many years and has always been a liberal supporter of this institution.

He commands the respect and good will of his fellowmen and, being of more than average intelligence, and possessing a good education, it was natural that he should be prominent in all the public affairs of his community. He formed an extensive acquaintance and is known to a large number of people throughout the county. No citizen of Plymouth is more respected and none has a more enviable business record than he.


Source

Information gathered and adapted from History of Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, Past and Present
Carl Zillier, Editor
Pubished by The S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1912, Chicago, IL