The Pioneer

WILLIAM PAINE

William Paine was an Englishman and came to this country from London in 1827, first settling in Buffalo, New York. From there he went to Chicago and met Colonel Oliver C. Crocker, with whom he entered into a partnership, for the building of a sawmill and establishing a lumber business in this section of the country. After remaining here a short time Paine went to Milwaukee, was instrumental in founding Saukville, in the county of that name, and finally took up his residence in Chicago, where he died in 1868. Colonel Crocker removed to Binghamton, New York, where he became prominent in political circles of the Empire state.

WILLIAM FARNSWORTH

William Famsworth, the real pioneer of Sheboygan county, was an independent trapper and dealer in furs and established himself among the Indians here. He made Sheboygan his permanent home and for many years his activities in this new community were prominent factors in its early growth and prosperity.

CHARLES D. COLE

Charles D. Cole was foremost among the pioneers of Sheboygan. He was born in Schenectady, New York, October 19, 1806, and in 1831 married Sarah W. Trowbridge, who was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1813. She was a daughter of Deacon William and Dorothea (Chapin) Trowbridge, mentioned elsewhere in this work. Charles Cole came up the lakes in a sailing vessel in 1836 and landed near the mouth of the Sheboygan river, on the site of the present city of Sheboygan. He first camped on the beach, where with others he built a shanty of slabs, but shortly after- ward removed to the Sheboygan House, which had just been completed.

Without much delay he and William Farnsworth built a warehouse, where they engaged in merchandising and buying furs of the Indians. Their goods and provisions were brought in boats from Milwaukee during the season of navigation. Sometimes birch bark canoes were the only means of conveyance by water, while at other seasons trips were made by land to Milwaukee and return with ox teams and wagons. Mr. Cole made many such trips, enduring hardships at times both by water and land. A winter trip with oxen sometimes consumed two weeks. In 1838 Mr. Cole removed to Sheboygan Falls, where he made his permanent home. He bought in that town three hundred and twenty acres, which contained considerable pine that he cut and made into lumber and shingles. He became familiar with the location of many tracts of government land in Sheboygan county and entered a great deal of it for the early settlers and for himself. In 1848 he built a sawmill on Pigeon river in what is now the town of Sheboygan, which he operated for a time. Later he bought the water power at Sheboygan Falls, where he owned and operated a sawmill and grist mill. Both institutions proved of great use to the settlers then rapidly opening up the wilds of Sheboygan county to civilization. He bought saw logs from the farmers both of Sheboygan and Manitowoc counties, the money they received from him being of great assistance in procuring teams, tools and household supplies in those early days.

Much of the lumber he manufactured was rafted down the Sheboygan river to Sheboygan, where it was in great demand for building purposes in that growing hamlet, or by shipment by vessels to Milwaukee and Chicago. At the same time he carried on farming. He was aided by his sons in these various occupations in which he was engaged until the close of his life. His death occurred March 20, 1867, at the age of sixty years. Other members of Mr. Cole's family joined him in Sheboygan shortly after he settled here. His brother, John Beekman Cole, who was also employed on the Erie canal in early life, came to Sheboygan in 1845, and for a time was interested in milling on Pigeon river. He also engaged in farming and the grain business in Sheboygan. He was the first to occupy the Beekman House, which was named after Mr. Cole and was in its day the leading hotel of the Chair City.

George C. Cole, another brother, arrived in Sheboygan in 1842, accompanied by his mother, and Mary, Sarah and Clara, his sisters. Mary became the wife of James L. Trowbridge; Sarah married Henry Willard; and Clara married John E. Thomas. It might further be said of Charles D. Cole that he was appointed postmaster in 1836, while keeping a hotel, and was one of the first to hold that office in the territory embraced in the county of Sheboygan. On the organization of the county he was chosen the first registrar of deeds and went to Green Bay, where he made a trans- cript of the records pertaining to the new county.

WILLIAM ASHBY

William Ashby was one of the venturesome yet hardy spirits who set his stakes for habitation in Sheboygan town in the year 1836, coming here from Oneida county, New York. At the time of his arrival there were but two families in Sheboygan, those of Charles Cole and A. G. Dye. The following incident is related by Mr. Ashby as an example of the hardships of pioneer life. The first year he lived in the county he ran out of bread in the dead of winter. In company with Charles Cole, Tom Perry and the blacksmith he hitched up four yoke of oxen and made his way through immense snowdrifts to Milwaukee, and on the return, near the present site of Port Washington, a terrible blizzard came up and the travelers believed they would surely perish. One of the men had his feet severely frozen and one of the oxen died from the cold. Another ox had his feet so badly frozen that he was useless, but in spite of these trials and difficulties they persevered and made their way safely home. Mr. Ashby became one of the influential men of the county.

A. G. DYE

Early in the summer of 1836, A. G. Dye, then living in Chicago, was employed by Charles D. Cole to come to Sheboygan and build a warehouse. He brought his family and several carpenters to assist him in the work. They came by the way of the lake, first going to Green Bay and were nearly a month making the voyage. In the spring of 1839 Mr. Dye moved from Sheboygan to the town of Lima and located on section 8, which was long known as the Dye settlement. Here his son Andrew was born September 2nd, 1841, in a shanty, 12 by 16 feet, made of rough boards, covered with slabs. There was no chimney in this habitation and the smoke escaped through a stovepipe thrust through the roof. With the furniture in the room there was hardly space enough in which to set the table. This dwelling was in the midst of the forest and no road but an Indian trail passed the door. It might be here related that A. G. Dye, known to the pioneer as "Deacon" Dye, built the first frame house in Sheboygan, and his wife made the first pound of butter there.

"Deacon" Dye would often go with the Indians to cut down "bee trees" and thus supplied the table with honey. During one winter the family lived for several days on salt pork and potatoes, for the vessel which was to bring them provisions could not land on account of a storm and had to put back into port at Milwaukee. When the household effects were being moved from Sheboygan to the farm, as they had no wagon, they would place some of the articles on a forked limb, using the extended piece as the tongue of a wagon and thus hauled their goods to their destination. In those early days Mr. Dye drove his cattle from Milwaukee and while resting at night the animals would often stray away, thus causing much trouble in the search for them.

All of the hardships and trials of the pioneer life were experienced by the Dye family. Sometimes the Indians were troublesome on account of having taken too much liquor and would go to the Dye home, where they would spend the night, lying so thick on the floor that in the morning Mr. Dye could hardly get to the fire place. Deer and other wild game were plentiful and wolves often prowled around. On different occasions Mrs. Dye went to the door and threw fire brands among them in order to frighten them away.

WILLIAM TROWBRIDGE

William ("Deacon") Trowbridge was one of the real pioneers of Sheboygan county, coming here in 1836 and first locating at Sheboygan. The next year he removed to the Falls. He spent the winter with Charles Cole at Sheboygan. At that time there were about fifteen habitations in the city. Sheboygan Falls had about five residences besides the sawmill. There were no churches and schoolhouses and religious services were held in a small office belonging to David Giddings. "Deacon" Trowbridge was the first minister of the gospel in this part of the county. He was sent for from far and near to preach funeral sermons, his trips sometimes being made on horseback and at other times on foot. He was one of the prime movers in the erection of the First Baptist church in Sheboygan Falls. James L. Trowbridge, his son, was fifteen years of age, at this time.

DAVID GIDDINGS

David Giddings was a native of Massachusetts, and came west in the spring of 1835, first stopping at Milwaukee, from which place he walked to Green Bay with a companion named Eaton. He secured a contract to survey twelve townships in the southeast comer of the state, and secured from his employer $200 to purchase one hundred and sixty acres of land near Sheboygan. That year he came on a vessel to Sheboygan for lumber and returned on it to Green Bay. Mr. Giddings came to Sheboygan to reside in 1837, and having purchased a lot on Pennsylvania avenue, erected thereon a store building. Upon the organization of Sheboygan and Manitowoc counties he was elected county judge. In 1838 he purchased an undivided half of the mills at Sheboygan Falls and about four hundred acres of land, including the village plat. Going there to reside and take charge of the mills, he also went into the lumber and real-estate business. He purchased the first shingle mill introduced into Wisconsin and worked hard to build up Sheboygan Falls and the surrounding country, often giving the settlers lots and selling them on credit the lumber with which to build their houses. When the United States road was relaid from Chicago to Green Bay by Captain Cram, the plan was to have it run through Sheboygan but by the earnest efforts of Mr. Giddings the road was laid through Sheboygan Falls.

In order to secure it to that village he surveyed the road from Manitowoc to Port Washington without compensation. When in the legislature Mr. Giddings introduced a bill to allow the county offices to be held at Sheboygan Falls, which would have eventually made it the county seat. He erected two sawmills and a flouring mill on Onion river, two and a half miles south of the Falls, also a sawmill at Hingham and one on the Sheboygan river three miles above the Falls. In company with A. Z. Littlefield he erected a double sawmill at Sheboygan Falls on the south side of the river, where Brickner's woolen mill now stands. Mr. Giddings built the first bridge across the Sheboygan river at that place and surveyed a road to open traffic between Sheboygan and Fond du Lac. In company with a few others he built and owned for several years the plank road extending from the former city to the village of Sheboygan Falls. When Sheboygan county appropriated $100,000 to help build the railroad from Sheboygan to Fond du Lac, Mr. Giddings was appointed as one of the three commissioners to see that the money was judiciously distributed. It goes without saying that this pioneer was a progressive builder and maker of communities. He lived to a ripe old age.

WENTWORTH BARBER

The residence of Wentworth Barber in Sheboygan county dates from December 8, 1841. He was a native of Vermont. Mr. Barber worked for the old Indian trader, William Farnsworth, and on one occasion when he had charge of the "flats*' the Indians pitched their tents there. The red skins were ordered by Mr, Barber to leave, but refusing to do so, he threw them into the river. Subsequently "Little Thunder," an Indian who had taken too much liquor, threatened to kill him but Mr. Barber at the time had in his hand an ox goad about four feet long, with a spike in the end of it, with which he gave the Indian a jab in the hand. The squaws carried him away and Mr. Barber had no further trouble. In 1845 the latter entered eighty acres of government land in Lyndon town, the first entered in the community.

M. J. LYNCH

Michael John Lynch, whose native state was New York, arrived in Sheboygan in 1842 in company with John King. He was a contractor and is said to have built the first bridge across the Sheboygan river. He also did much contract work on street grading and improvements. He was appointed by Franklin Pierce collector for the port of Sheboygan and was a veteran of the Civil war.

WORTHY MCKILLIP

Worthy McKillip came from the Empire state to Sheboygan in 1842 and engaged in manufacturing lumber. He was soon after his arrival made deputy sheriff of what was then Brown county. In 1845 he built a large frame building on the corner of Pennsylvania avenue and Seventh street. Previous to this, however, he had served as register of deeds but on the completion of this building he engaged in the mercantile business.

MAJOR NATHAN COLE

Major Nathan Cole, a veteran of the Civil war, is a son of Charles D. and Sarah (Trowbridge) Cole. He was born in the town of Sheboygan Falls, November 22, 1842. On his return home from the war he operated a flouring mill and was subsequently elected register of deeds, following which he was appointed assistant collector of internal revenue and afterward was made collector of internal revenue. In 1881 President Arthur appointed him postmaster of Sheboygan.

AUGUST EBENREITER

One of the earliest settlers in the town of Sheboygan Falls was August Ebenreiter, who came from his native Germany with his wife Susanna in 1842. He settled on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he bought of William Whiffen.

BARTHOLOMEW TRUMBLA

Bartholomew Trumbla came into the county from Michigan in 1840 and later became a settler of Wilson town. In 1844 he purchased forty acres of land on what is known as Lake View Park.

GERT J. HELBELINK

Gert J. Helbelink was one of the early settlers of Holland town, arriving here in the early '40s, and was joined a few years later by his father, Aretyan. Gert settled on section 27, In 1850 he bought forty acres of land on section 26, where he took up his residence, having built thereon a log cabin.

THADDEUS HARMON

Thaddeus and Betsey (Waugh) Harmon, natives of New. York, were among the early settlers of Sheboygan county, coming here in 1844, four years before Wisconsin was admitted to the Union. With their family, among which was a son, Simon M., they embarked on the propeller Vandalia, expecting to locate in Milwaukee but on reaching that place they changed their plans, loaded their goods into four wagons, drawn by oxen, and started for Sheboygan county. On coming to the Milwaukee river they found the stream very much swollen. How to cross this without bridge or ferry boat was the problem. The old Indian Waubaca and his warriors lived close by but their only means of crossing the river was by canoes. When the Indians saw them halted by the raging torrent they gave vent to a shout of derision. The sturdy New England grit, however, was not easily put to flight. By means of canoes the men paddled their wives and children across the stream, swam the oxen over and then by means of ropes drew the wagons heavily loaded with pork, flour and provisions, brought from New York, all landing in safety. This feat, so successfully accomplished, excited the wonder and admiration of the Indians over the genius and daring of the. white men.

During the trip rain fell in torrents and the roads in many places became almost impassable. Frequently the teams would almost sink in the quagmires and women and children would have to get out of the wagons. Instead of walking miles around when they encountered a body of water, these sturdy pioneer women so adjusted their apparel that it would not get wet and boldly waded in. Onion river presented another obstacle but here, unfortunately, there were no canoes. The men showed their gallantry by carrying the women across on their backs. J. D. Parrish, who was of the party, was carrying Mrs. Betsey Harmon, when, on stepping on a mossy stone his foot slipped and both went under the water, which, as Mrs. Harmon said, "made practical Baptists out of genuine Congregationalists." The women and children of this company, were thus transported over the river. Their objective point was Deacon Dye's settlement, where they arrived in due time and found the Deacon at his home, which was known as pioneer headquarters.

The first stopping place of the Harmon and Parrish families was at Harmon Spring, which is located just east of Simon Harmon's residence. Their first habitation, a log house 24 by 30 feet, was built at the spring. Having made and hauled the logs, they put up the body of the house in one day. A number of Indians who were watching them roll up the logs, were asked to help lift, but thinking the white men were plotting their destruction, they obstinately refused. Having covered about fourteen feet of the roof with rough boards and having thrown down loose ones for a floor, the beds were arranged around the wall. Before retiring Deacon Trowbridge called in to make them a visit and remained over night. When the lights were extinguished and the stars shone down through the uncovered portions of the cabin, the Deacon remarked that "this would be a good place in which to study astronomy."

The first winter that the colonists settled here no provisions could be purchased at Sheboygan, hence Mr. Harmon and Mr. Parrish started with ox teams for Milwaukee. The weather was intensely cold and before they had gone fourteen miles Mr. Harmon's feet were badly frozen. During their absence their families were left at the mercy of the pitiless winter storms and prowling Indians. Arriving in Milwaukee, Mr. Harmon purchased nine barrels of flour at twenty shillings per barrel. He also bought a carcass of beef, paying two and a half cents per pound. He also bought other necessaries. Thus well supplied he returned to his anxiously waiting family.

The first land purchased by the Harmons consisted of about seven hundred acres covered with timber. By hard work they converted this into the finest farms to be found in Sheboyan county. In their cabin homes religious services were held, for as yet no churches had been built. The first schoolhouse located in that part of the county was built at Four Corners, east of the residence of Simon M. Harmon, who was one of the promoters of that enterprise. Simon Harmon also assisted in laying out many of the highways in the town of Lyndon and in many other ways became a prominent factor in its advancement.

JONATHAN LEIGHTON

Jonathan Leighton arrived here from the state of Maine in 1844 and embarked in the lumber business, in which he continued twenty years. With his father-in-law, Aurin Z. Littlefield, he built a sawmill, which was known as the Littlefield & Leighton mill.

CHARLES W. PIERCE

Charles W. Pierce, who was born in Sheboygan in 1848, is the son of William J. Pierce, who came from England in 1844 and settled in Sheboygan.

JOHN D. PARRISH

John D. Parrish and his wife, Jane, came by wagon and boats from New York to Sheboygan county in 1844 and purchased two tracts of land in this town. They first lived in a log cabin without a floor and in order to reach the loft they were compelled to climb by means of pegs driven into the logs. There were only half a dozen neighbors in the locality, the Indians being more numerous than the whites. One day a band of some thirty Indians passed and Mrs. Parrish was much amused by seeing a very tall red man riding on a diminutive pony, so small indeed that the Indian had great trouble in keeping his feet from dragging on the ground.

Mr. Parrish, like many of the other pioneers, made shingles from pine trees, which were transported by ox teams and traded for provisions in Milwaukee. One morning four deer were seen grazing contentedly only a stone's throw from the cabin door. They purchased a cow in Milwaukee for $11. Mrs. Parrish made quite a reputation for herself as a weaver of cloth and ran a loom for nearly twenty years, spinning and weaving cloth for her family. When she came here Sheboygan City was a small hamlet, with a dense growth of pines on its present site. In early days she often rode to Sheboygan in an ox cart and would knit all the way to town.

Relic of Pioneer Days
Relic of Pioneer Days

RUFUS WHEELER

Rufus Wheeler came with his parents, Richmond and Sallie (Albersofi) Wheeler, from New York to Sheboygan in 1844. The water was so shallow that it was necessary to use a yawl boat to convey the passengers to the shore. Aft the time the city from where Holy Name Catholic church now stands as far as the soldiers' monument was covered with brush and pine trees and Indiana avenue was a dense wilderness. Indians were numerous and the father often hunted with the red men, killing deer in Lima town and Sheboygan Falls. He was one of the earliest settlers and lived in Lima town when it was called Wakefield and later Wheat Valley.

SYLVANUS WADE

Sylvanus Wade was a pioneer of 1844. He was born in North Adams, Massachusetts. He built a log cabin in Greenbush and opened a blacksmith shop and also plowed ten acres of prairie, and in addition kept a hotel. There was no road cut through to Fond du Lac at that time and in the fall of 1850 the first plank road meeting was held at his home.

HARMON PIERCE

Harmon Pierce, a native of Massachusetts, was one of the pioneers of Sheboygan county, coming to Sheboygan Falls in 1842, in which year he built a mill just below the bridge opposite Brickner's woolen mills, where he made the first superfine flour in the county.

ALBAN KENT

Alban Kent was one of the early settlers in Sheboygan. He left the fatherland in 1833 and settled in Erie, Pennsylvania, from whence he came here in 1844. He at once built a home and started a tailoring establishment, which was one of the first in the village. Later Mr. Kent opened a bakery and grocery on the shore end of the old north pier, where he carried on quite a business for four years, when his place was wrecked by the waves during a very severe storm, when his stock and household goods were lost. He then resumed work at his trade and retired therefrom in 1889, at the age of eighty-one years.

LUTHER WITT

Luther Witt, with his young bride, Betsy Thompson, arrived in Sheboygan county and located on a farm about two miles south of Cascade, in 1845. A few years later he removed to Plymouth town.

DAVID S. M'INTYRE

David S. Mclntyre, with his young bride, came to Lyndon town in 1845 and purchased eighty acres of unbroken land. He afterward removed to an eighty acre farm on section 21.

WILLIAM WHIFFEN

William Whiffen, a native of England, came to Sheboygan in the fall of 1845. He immediately purchased a farm in the town of Sheboygan Falls and lived there until 1875, when he returned to Sheboygan.

HENRY OILMAN

Henry Oilman, a native of New York, was one of the arrivals of 1845. Here he preempted a quarter section of land, which he disposed of a year later and purchased a farm on section 26.

EDMOND WRIGHT

Edmond Wright and his wife Elizabeth, natives of New York, settled in Plymouth town in 1845. John Wesley Briggs, a brother of Mrs. Wright, preceded them to the town in 1844. In 1846 Mrs. Briggs started out alone to call on a neighbor who had recently moved into the settlement. She was never again seen alive and the most diligent search failed to reveal her whereabouts. She left home on the 27th of April and on the 4th of July her dead body was found by the Indians in what is now known as the "big bend" of the Sheboygan river in Manitowoc county. The cause of her death has ever remained a mystery.

HIRAM BISHOP

In November, 1845, Hiram Bishop, a native of New York, came to the locality upon which the city of Plymouth now stands, then in its primitive state. For a time he worked for H. I. Davidson, clearing the timber from the ground which now marks the city of Plymouth.

AMHERST P. HUMPHREY

Amherst P. Humphrey came with his father and mother, Hiram and Martha Humphrey, to Lima town in 1845, and in 1849 the father bestowed the name of Lima upon the town in honor of his old home in New York. The family at first lived in a log cabin upon a tract of land which he had bought, consisting of forty acres. There were many Indians in the neighborhood at this time and deer and wolves were plentiful. He was active in erecting the first house in the town and gave a good part of the lumber that went into the first Methodist church erected at the Falls.

TIMOTHY LITTLEFIELD

Timothy Littlefield came to Lima town in 1845 with his parents, Zebediah and Deborah Littlefield, from Maine.

JOHN SHAVER

John Shaver and family were pioneers of Lima town, coming from New York in 1845, but removed to Holland the following year, where he bought one hundred and sixty acres of timber land on section 14.

DR. CEPHAS WHIPPLE

Dr. Cephas Whipple settled in Lima town on one hundred and sixty acres of land, in 1845. He built the first good frame house and planted the first orchard of any importance in Sheboygan county, with one or two exceptions.

JACOB DE SMIDT

Jacob De Smidt was among the earliest of the settlers in Holland town, coming here from Holland in 1845. At that time Mr. De Smidt purchased of George Cole eighty acres of timber land at $1.25 per acre.

PETER ZEEVELD

Peter Zeeveld, with his father, Lawrence Zeeveld, arrived in the town of Holland in 1845. They settled on section 24 and stayed there about a year, when it was discovered that the property could not be purchased from the government and accordingly one hundred and sixty acres were preempted on sections 35 and 36.

AUGUST KALMERTON

August Kalmerton was one of the pioneers of Sheboygan Falls town, arriving here about 1845, with his young wife Sophia. At that time there were about a dozen habitations in the village and Sheboygan had scarcely more than twenty-five houses.

ANDREW J. WHIFFEN

Andrew J. Whiffen, who was the first superintendent of the Sheboygan County Chronic Insane Asylum, was born in the Empire state and came with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Whiffen, and settled in Sheboygan Falls in 1845.

EVAN EVANS

Evan Evans was a settler here in 1845. For some time he worked at his trade of carpentry and for ten years was a toll keeper on the Sheybogan-Fond du Lac plank road. He later became a farmer.

WILLIAM SEAMAN

William Seaman, a native of New York, arrived in Sheboygan in 1845. William Henry Seaman, who became United States judge of the eastern district of Wisconsin, and later appointed to the United States Court of Appeals, was a son of Williams and Arelisle Seaman, and immigrated to Sheboygan with his parents in the winter of 1845-6. He was working in the Evergreen City Times office when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted as a private in Company H, First Regiment Wisconsin Infantry. He read law with C. W. Ellis, of Sheboygan, and later with J. A. Bently, being admitted to the bar in 1868. In 1893 he was appointed to the United States bench.

DAVID S. JENKINS

David S. Jenkins, founder of the Jenkins Machine Company, came with his parents, Pryce and Margaret Jenkins, from Wales, in 1845, after having spent one year at Racine.

THOMAS LAWSON

Thomas Lawson came with his parents, Robert and Hannah Lawson, from England in 1846, and settled here.

JAMES STONE

James and Lucinda Stone were among the sturdy pioneers who settled in Sheboygan county in 1846. Mr. Stone was instrumental in establishing the first post office in Lyndon town, which was called Winooski, and served as postmaster for eight years. The first district school was established in the northern part of the town, which was taught by his daughter Helen, who had an experience which is worthy of relation. It was the custom in those days, as is well known, for the teacher to board around. This custom was necessarily observed by Helen, who came home every Saturday night, remaining until Sunday night. It happened to be the last of December and no snow had fallen. Helen arrived home as usual and when it began to snow on Sunday after dinner, she said to her mother: "I must start now or I shall not be able to see the marks on the trees," for they were the only means by which she was guided on her way to the home where she was to board that week. Her mother suggested that if she must go she had better put on her brother Helmar's thin boots, which she did, carrying her shoes in her hand. She had not gone far when she discovered that she had lost her way, and so dark was the night that she could not see to retrace her steps, though the snow storm had ceased. As she wandered, she kept walking faster and faster, fearing lest she should be compelled to remain out all night. Having tramped many weary miles, she caught sight of a spark of fire and going toward it, she found to her great joy that it was a lighted candle in the house of Samuel Reed, with whom she had boarded the week before. During the first hours that she had tramped through the woods, her clothing had become thoroughly soaked but at the home of that hospitable pioneer her wants were provided for. It should be stated that through all this excitement she clung to her shoes.

After living here for about a year, Mrs. Stone concluded to write home and tell her people of her pioneer life but she found that she had no pen. "Necessity," however, "is the mother of invention," and walking out into the yard she found the quill of some bird and hastened back to make her pen. She had to sharpen the quill with a butcher knife. Her ink was made of copperas and maple bark, and her writing desk was a peck measure turned upside down. Hospitality reigned in those days and yet the ladies dressed in calico gowns and sunbonnets and their husbands in homespun. However, they enjoyed life with that zest which makes a pleasure all the more enjoyable for the work that has gone before. In 1894, when Mrs. Stone had reached the ripe old age of ninety-five and a half years, she was hale and hearty and wrote a hand that was almost as legible as print

SELDEN AKIN

Selden Akin was in Lyndon town about as early as 1846, when he purchased two eighty-acre tracts on sections 5 and 8. He spent the winter of 1847 clearing fifteen acres, which he cultivated in the spring.

C. L. SIBLEY

C. L. Sibley, a native of New York, settled in the village of Sheboygan in May, 1846. He subsequently lived in Sheboygan Falls for two years, where he engaged in the manufacture of fanning mills, and then bought eighty acres of land in Lyndon town on which he built a log cabin and moved there.

WILLIAM BURTON

William Burton, with his parents, William and Mary Burton, settled on an eighty-acre timber farm in Lyndon, on section 36, in 1846. William attended the first school in Lyndon township, held in a house which his father helped to build. The teacher was Helen Stone. Others who taught there were Mrs. E. P. Andrus, Glandville Jewett and Harvey Cimimings. The first church services were held in a log schoolhouse near the Burton home.

LEVI H. PELTON

Levi H. Pelton removed from Trumbull county, Ohio, to Lyndon in 1846, and was one of the pioneers of this community. His son, Dr. Levi H. Pelton, was bom here July 10, 1848.

JOHN H. DREYER

John Henry Dreyer after arriving at the port of New Orleans from Germany in the fall of 1846, came direct to Herman town and settled on a one hundred and sixty acre farm on section 22. Here he kept a tavern, a very popular resort for a number of years.

FREDERICK BURHOP

In the latter part of 1846 Frederick Burhop, a native of Germany, settled in Herman town.

FREDERICK PRIGGE

Frederick Prigge was a native of Germany and came to the United States in 1846. In the summer of that year he arrived in Sheboygan county and located in Herman on section 36, having bought a half section for ten shillings an acre. On the 12th day of June, 1848, John E. P. C. Prigge, a son, was born to him, and Ernst Schlicting, Peter Meyer, and Christian Wiehe became godfathers to the babe. Numerous are the incidents related by Mr. Prigge of the gatherings of Indians in counsel at his home.

DR. J. J. BROWN

Dr. John Julius Brown was one of the pioneer physicians of Sheboygan, locating here in 1846.

BENJAMIN ORRIN COON

Benjamin Orrin Coon, a native of New York, settled in Sheboygan town in the fall of 1846 and was soon joined by his parents, James and Susanna Coon. At that time Hiram Bishop, Henry Oilman and Ira Bradford were making homes for themselves here.

EVERT HARTMAN

Evert Hartman was a pioneer of 1846, coming to the hamlet of Sheboygan with his parents. Derrick J. and Hattie Hartman.

GEORGE KOEBEL

George Koebel emigrated from Germany to Sheboygan in 1846 and a year later he was joined by his father and mother, Peter and Margaret Koebel. They then located on a farm in Plymouth town in June of the latter year, each taking up a claim of eighty acres on section 9. To procure seed wheat the elder Koebel, his wife and son, George, walked nine miles to the home of Deacon Trowbridge, where they secured a sufficient amount in the sheaf and, after threshing the wheat with a flail, they carried it home on their backs, first paying one dollar a bushel for it. In order to secure an ox team with which to put in the wheat, George worked for a neighbor in exchange for the use of his oxen. When Mr. Koebel landed in the county he had about thirty dollars in money. Half of this he paid for a cow in Milwaukee.

WILLIAM. D. MOORE

On the 4th of August, 1846, William D. Moore and a brother arrived in Sheboygan county from New Jersey, and settled on section 33 in the town of Plymouth.

JAMES DE GROFF

James De Groff, a native of New York, settled in the town of Plymouth with his family in 1846. William H. De Groff a son, came with his parents at the time. The latter married Margaret Adelaide Dye, who was born in Lima town in 1839. Her father, Asel Gordon Dye, was one of the first settlers in Sheboygan.

JOHN W. TAYLOR

John W. Taylor, a native of New York, in 1846 purchased of H. I. Davidson the land on which the city of Plymouth now stands, upon which a log cabin had been built by Mr. Davidson. Mr, Taylor at once enlarged the cabin, which became a station for the traveling public, being on the stage road between Sheboygan and Fond du Lac. For a number of years Mr. Taylor kept hotel and assisted in locating the settlers who were searching for new homes. Soon after becoming settled, Mr. Taylor returned to New York and brought back his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elisha Taylor. Elisha built the first frame house in Plymouth and John Taylor employed a surveyor to lay out the town plat of Plymouth, which he intended to call Springfield, from the number of cold springs that abound in the locality, but Mr. Davidson persuaded him to name the place Plymouth. H. I. Davidson became the second postmaster of the new village.

DAVID W. GILBERT

One of the earliest settlers in Lima, and in fact in the county, was David W. Gilbert, who arrived in Sheboygan with his wife, Keziah, in the summer of 1846, landing at the pier in Sheboygan, having made the journey from Buffalo by water. After two weeks spent in prospecting he bought sixty-five acres of land in Lima town for $1.25 an acre, upon which he erected a frame building 16x24 feet. He was present at the first election in the town and was made one of the supervisors.

BENJAMIN TIBBITTS

Benjamin and Sallie Tibbits were natives of Maine and emigrated to Sheboygan county with their family of nine children in 1846, purchasing eighty acres of largely improved land, upon which was a small log and frame house, in Lima town. The first mill dam in Hingham was erected by Mr. Tibbitts for Mr. Giddings.

JOHN W. SWETT

John W. and Hannah D. Swett came to Sheboygan county from New York in 1846 and settled in Lima town, and hence were among the pioneers of this locality.

JACOB REIS

Jacob and Marie Reis came from Germany in 1845 and settled in Scott town in 1846, where their son, Jacob Reis, was bom in 1849.

HON. CAD W. HUMPHREY

One of the foremost settlers of Mitchell town was Hon. Cad W. Humphrey, who came from Oneida county, New York, in 1846, and preempted a claim, upon which he built a cabin and "kept batch" until his marriage in 1848 to Maria Elizabeth Van De Mark. He was one of the early commissioners for Sheboygan county, serving as sheriff, supervisor, superintendent of schools and member of the Wisconsin assembly.

JAMES H. DENISON

James H. Denison came from New York in 1846 with his young bride, who was Louisa Cole, and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of unim- proved land.

AZAEL P. LYMAN

Azael P. Lyman located in Sheboygan in 1846. With his brother George, who had located in Sheboygan Falls in 1845, he established stores in Fond du Lac, Calumet, Berlin and Sheboygan. He became one of the prominent and influential men of Sheboygan and one of its first boatbuilders.

WILLIAM F. ZIERATH

William F. Zierath, a native of Germany, first came to Sheboygan in 1846, looking for a business location. He returned to Qeveland but in the following year purchased property here and was then joined by his family. He engaged in hotel keeping, as proprietor of the St. Clair House, and con- ducted it until his death, which occurred in the latter part of 1870.

JAMES CROCKER

James and Margaret (Leland) Crocker came here in 1846. Their son, Silas R., followed them in 1853. ^^ was a carpenter and worked on the first dredge that was used in opening the harbor in Sheboygan. He then became identified with the manufacturing interests of the city. In 1866, with others, he put up a sawmill on Pennsylvania avenue and began preparations to manufacture chairs.

IN THE VILLAGE OF SHEBOYGAN

Arvin L. Weeks was born in Massachusetts and came to the then village of Sheboygan in 1848. He was an experienced architect and builder and followed his profession the following ten years. He built the first brick schoolhouse in Sheboygan and the first courthouse; Mr. Weeks served as harbor master for seven years.

John Sandrok, a native of Germany, located here in 1849. He was chief of the fire department for some time, and in 1874 was elected sheriff. His trade was that of contracting and building.

Horatio Nelson Smith identified his interests with those of Sheboygan in 1847, coming here from Vermont. He was one of the pioneer merchants of the city. Soon thereafter he opened a store in Plymouth and placed his younger brother, Patrick Henry, in charge. In 1850 Mr. Smith removed his entire business to Pl)rmouth. He was elected to the general assembly from Sheboygan in the fall of 1848 and in 1852 became state senator.

Thomas Long, a native of Ireland, took up his home in Sheboygan in 1849. Pot several years thereafter he followed the lakes both as officer of the vessel and owner. In 1886 he became identified with the Jenkins Machine Company.

George Thies came from Germany in 1846 and spent about a year in Chicago. The year 1847 found him in Sheboygan clerking in the general store of Charles Moore. In 1858 Mr. Thies was elected sheriff of the county, and in 1868, county clerk.

William Holle was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1821, and immigrated to this country in 1847, taking up his residence in Sheboygan, where he bought a store and engaged in merchandising.

David S. Jenkins of the Jenkins Machine Company, came with his parents, Pryce and Margaret Jenkins, from Wales in 1845, after having spent one year at Racine.

Carl Zillier immigrated to the United States with his parents, Andrew and Julia (Franke) Zillier, in 1849, coming direct to Sheboygan in June of that year. He became a printer and worked as a compositor in the offices of the Journal and Republikaner. In 1857 he bought out the Republikaner and established the National Demokrat, which he built up to become the leading German paper in the state, outside of Milwaukee. He held various offices of trust in the community. In i860 he was city clerk; 1863 and 1864 he represented this district in the general assembly. He was city comptroller two terms. In 1870 he was elected county clerk and was his own successor for two terms. He also served on the board of super- visors for several years and most of the time was chairman of that body. In 1886 and also in 1895 President Grover Cleveland appointed him postmaster. Mr. Zillier has been one of the active and influential men of the community. He is now living in retirement.

Fred Pape arrived in this city from Germany in August, 1848, coming with his parents, Conrad and Caroline Pape. For some time after his arrival he was engaged in carrying the mails between Sheboygan and Port Washington on horseback through the woods. Eventually he became an engineer on the Northwestern, then agent for the Goodrich Transportation Company and later proprietor of the Kossuth House, which he named the Pape House.

John G. Pantzer located here in 1848, coming from Germany. He was one of the pioneer cigar manufacturers of Sheybogan.

David W. Halsted, Sr., a native of New York, came to Sheboygan in 1841, but a year later removed to Calumet county, where his son, David Wisner Halsted, was born in 1845.

Frank Stone came from Massachusetts with his parents, Lewis and Lucy (Howe) Stone, in 1848, and settled in Sheboygan, where the father engaged in merchandising on Eighth street.

Michael John Lynch, whose native state was New York, arrived in Sheboygan in 1842 in company with John King. He was a contractor and is said to have built the first bridge across the Sheboygan river. He also did much contract work on street grading and improvement. He was appointed by Franklin Pierce collector for the port of Sheboygan and was a veteran of the Civil war.

Thomas M. Blackstock, with an aunt and three sisters, his mother having preceded him, arrived in Sheboygan in the spring of 1849. He first found employment in a hotel, then was engaged for six years in a drug store. In 1856 he was superintendent of construction of the Sheboygan-Fond du Lac plank road and served in that capacity until 1861. He then purchased the drug business of Dr. J. J. Brown, which he conducted until 1876. In 1875, however, he took an active part in the organization and establishment of the Phoenix Chair Company and within a year was chosen president and general manager of the company. Mr. Blackstock became one of the strong and influential men not only of Sheboygan but of this part of the state and was mentioned as a possible candidate for the governorship in 1892.

Joseph Schrage was one of the pioneer merchants of Sheboygan, locating here in 1847 and opening a grocery store. He later built the Wisconsin House, well known to the early settlers. He eventually became one of the prominent merchants of Sheboygan.

Azael P. Lyman located in this city in 1846. With his brother George he had located in Sheboygan Falls in 1845 and established stores in Fond du Lac, Calumet, Berlin and Sheboygan. He became one of the prominent and influential men of Sheboygan and one of its first boatbuilders, in which he became well known.

Evan Evans was a settler here of 1845. For some time he worked at his trade of carpentry and for ten years was a toll keeper on the Sheboygan-Fond du Lac plank road. He later became a farmer.

William F. Zierath, a native of Germany, first came to Sheboygan in 1846, looking for a business location. He returned to Qeveland but in the following year purchased property here and was then joined by his family. He engaged in hotel keeping, as proprietor of the St. Clair House, which he operated until his death, which occurred in the latter part of 1870. William Seaman, a native of New York, came to Sheboygan in 1845. William Henry Seaman, who became United States judge of the eastern district of Wisconsin, was a son of William and Arlisle Seaman, and came to Sheboygan with his parents in the winter of 1845-6. He was working in the Evergreen City Times office when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted as a private in Company H, First Regiment Wisconsin Infantry. He read law with C. W. Ellis of Sheboygan and later with J. A. Bentley and was admitted to the bar in 1868. In 1893 he was appointed to the United States bench.

Worthy McKillip came from the Empire state to this city in 1842 and engaged in the manufacture of lumber. He was soon after his arrival made deputy sheriff of what was then Brown county. In 1845 he built a large frame building on the corner of Pennsylvania avenue and Seventh street. Previous to this, however, he had served as register of deeds but on the completion of his building he engaged in the mercantile business.

James and Margaret (Leland) Crocker came here in 1846. Their son, Silas R., followed them in 1853. He was a carpenter and worked on the first dredge that was used in opening the harbor in Sheboygan. He then became identified with the manufacturing interests of the city. In 1866, with others, he put up a sawmill on Pennsylvania avenue and began preparations to manufacture chairs.

Dr. John Julius Brown was one of the pioneer physicians of Sheboygan, locating here in 1846.

William Whiffen, a native of England, came to Sheboygan in the fall of 1845. He immediately purchased a farm in the town of Sheboygan Falls and lived there until 1875, when he returned to Sheboygan.

Alexander Hamilton Edwards came to Sheboygan in 1848 and after keeping the lighthouse for about a year became deputy register of deeds. He later was elected to the office of register. He also held the offices of clerk of the court and police judge, being in official positions for about twenty years.

Leopold and Francis Gutsch came to Sheboygan from Baden, Germany, in 1847, and established the Gutsch Brewing Company.

John Griffith, a native of New York, was a settler in Sheboygan as early as 1850 and one of the early merchants.

Isaac Brazleton came to Wisconsin from East Tennessee with his parents, Jacob and Margaret Brazleton, and settled near Milwaukee in 1835. In 1847 he removed to Sheboygan, where he carried on a meat market for a number of years.

Benjamin Orrin Coon, a native of New York, settled in the town of Plymouth in February, 1846, and was soon joined by his parents, James and Susanna Coon. By that time Hiram Bishop, Henry Gilman and Ira Bradford were making homes for themselves here.

Jonathan Leighton arrived here from the state of Maine in 1844 and embarked in the lumber business, in which he continued twenty years. With his father-in-law, Aurin Z. Littlefield, he built a sawmill, which was known as the Littlefield & Leighton mill.

Evert Hartman was a pioneer of 1846, coming here with his parents. Derrick J. and Hattie Hartman.

Charles W. Pierce, who was bom here in 1848, is the son of William J. Pierce, who came from England in 1844 and settled in Sheboygan.

Otto Schucht became a resident of the city of Sheboygan in 1849.

Hector North Ross was a pioneer teacher of this county. He arrived here from his native state of New York in June, 1847, and soon found work in the office of the Mercury. He had previously been admitted to the bar and the following fall after his arrival in Sheboygan he was elected to the office of county judge. The salary of the office at that time was small and in order to earn what he could he taught the village school in Sheboygan in the winter of 1849 and held the same position during the years 1852 and 1853. He purchased the Sheboygan Mercury in 1854. In 1870 he changed the name of the paper from the Evergreen City Times to that of the Sheboygan Times.

Henry W. Minott located here in 1848 and was joined by his brother, Levi E., in 1849, he engaged in the manufacture and sale of furniture.

Alban Kent was one of the early settlers of Sheboygan. He left the fatherland in 1833 and settled in Erie, Pennsylvania, from whence he came in the winter of 1844. He at once built a home and established a tailoring establishment, which was one of the first in the village. Later Mr. Kent opened a bakery and grocery on the shore end of the old north pier, where he carried on quite a business for four years, when his place was wrecked by the waves during a severe storm, when his stock and household goods were lost. He then resumed work at his trade and retired there,from in 1889, at the age of eighty-one years.

Joseph Keller, a German, opened a blacksmith shop here in 1849 to which he later added wood and paint shops, a foundry and machine shops. He also started a brickyard and operated it some six years, when he sold and built what is now Factory B of the Crocker Chair Company, which he managed for three years and then sold to the Crockers.

Christian Raab came in 1848 from Germany and became a grain dealer and shipbuilder.

Ernst and Anna Rietow, natives of Germany, came to the United States in 1848 and settled in Sheboygan, where he carried on a furniture establishment until 1852 and then removed to a farm in the town of Wilson. In 1855 he returned to Sheboygan and engaged in the furniture business until his death, in 1868.

John G. Mayer, a native of Germany, established himself in Sheboygan as a merchant tailor in 1848.

William Kroos, Sr., a native of Germany, emigrated to the United States in the fall of 1842 and landed at New Orleans. From there he went to St. Louis, which was his home for a number of years. 'Mr. Kroos took up his residence in the city of Sheboygan in 1847. He is living today, hale and hearty, at the age of ninety-four years.

Frederick Gustav Lintz, a native of Germany, arrived in the United States with his wife in 1847, sn^d coming west located on land north of Sheboygan City. His acres accumulated to a ntmiber over one thousand and he built a pier known as Lintz pier and did a big business in cutting and shipping wood, selling in one year $24,000 worth. He was liberal and helped many of the farmers in paying for their land. About six years after coming to this county he removed to Sheboygan City, where for over thirty years he did an extensive business in general merchandising and in lumber. He died in 1884.

Julius Kroos is a son of William Kroos, Sr., and was born in the Evergreen City in 1857. He is president of the Bank of Sheboygan, one of the strongest financial institutions in the state of Wisconsin.


Source

Information gathered and adapted from History of Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, Past and Present
Carl Zillier, Editor
Pubished by The S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1912, Chicago, IL


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